Winter Spring 2024

Hello everyone,

It’s hard to tell if spring is really here when people are in shorts in downtown Ottawa at the end of February and then temperatures plummet after March break. Even the usual Leafs being out joke is of no help this year. (For our American readers, please ask your Canadian neighbours to explain.) Luckily, when all else fails, we can check on the Friends of Lake Pemichangan (FLP) Facebook page for the one sure sign that spring is here and that’s that the ice is gone on the lake!

There have been changes on the FLP Board over the winter. Rick Roberston (Past President) and Pat Zakaib (Membership) have both left the Board. The FLP and the greater Pemichangan community thank Rick and Pat for their contributions and wish them the best in their new endeavours. The rest of the Board continues to meet once a month to discuss all things Pemichangan. For this issue, we thought you’d like to know a bit about some of the people who devote time and energy to furthering the FLP’s mission of preserving lake health. You’ll find that they represent quite a diversity of backgrounds and skills and that they have joined the Board for a wide variety of reasons. The Board is always looking to add to the mix so please contact Jeff Stanier if you want to join this group of interesting and FUN people.

MEET THE BOARD.

Jeff Stanier – President
We’ve had our cottage on the west side of île Chantigny since 2001. My wife and I are from Manitoba but spent lots of time in the forests of North-Western Ontario. When we first saw the lake we felt right at home with the clear waters, the rocky shores and the beautiful forests. Since then, we’ve met many great people, and made lots of friends on the lake and in the area. My background is in Engineering and I work developing wireless communication network products for Ericsson. I’ve been involved with the FLP since 2003 and joined the Board to know more about the lake and the history of the area.

Michèle Patry – Secretary and Communications
My family has been in Knight’s Bay (South end) since 1933. My grandchildren are our family’s sixth generation at the lake! I’m originally from southern Ontario but I spent my adult life in Montreal. Before retiring, I worked in law and translation. I joined the Board to ensure that the FLP’s communications are in both French and English and to meet people from all over the lake.

Karen Butterfield – Camping, Watershed and Lake Health
I found our place at the North end in 2006 when looking to bring my young family “back home” from London, England. I grew up in Montreal but moved around in Canada and then to France and England. We now live in Ottawa to be closer to the cottage. My background is in Engineering and Management Consulting but since retirement I have become a kayak instructor. I joined the Board to focus on lake health.

Tracey Henderson – Camping, Watershed and Lake Health
We’ve had our family cottage on the South end since 1972. I’ve never missed a summer at Pemichangan! I grew up in Ottawa but now live in Canmore, Alberta, where I work as a veterinarian very part time, which allows me to spend most of the summer and some of the fall at the lake. I joined the Board because I care deeply about the lake – its beauty, its health and all that it has to offer to those of us who are fortunate enough to call it home.

Marianne Kennedy-Beaulne – Outreach and North End
I am a relative newcomer to the lake, having acquired our North end cottage in 2019. I grew up in Montreal (for a few years) and the Greater Toronto Area (mostly), and ended up in Ottawa with my previously peripatetic husband, for whom the Ottawa/Outaouais region was a sort of home base. Before retiring I worked in law and knowledge management. I joined the Board to help further its efforts to protect the lake and ensure it remains as healthy as possible now and for future generations.

Nicole Laframboise – GFGC Liaison
My immediate family has had a cottage near the small twin islands at the North end for 17 years. I grew up spending summers on the Green Lake string of lakes at my grandparents’ cabin on Oxbow Lake. I am from the Outaouais region but have lived most of my adult life first in London, England, and Toronto, but mostly in the Washington, DC, area, working for an international financial institution. Before retiring last year I worked in economic research and public policy. I joined the Board to help promote the care, sustainability and stewardship of the lake for future generations.

Todd Norton – Camping Culture
My parents purchased a cottage at the South end in the summer of 1965 when I was a year and a half old. I was born and raised in Ottawa. I was blessed to grow up and spend summers on the lake with the same group of friends that I am still blessed to enjoy special summer moments with. I am a chiropractor in Ottawa. A particular concern growing up was the state of the campsites on the lake. I joined the Board to help safeguard the health of the lake and surrounding watershed.

Claire Poitras – Outreach and South End
My family has been in Knight’s Bay (South end) since 1933, following my grandfather’s canoeing expedition in 1927. My two sons are my family’s fifth generation at the lake. I live in Chambly, on Montreal’s South Shore. I teach operations management and logistics at Hautes Études Commerciales Montréal. A proud French-speaking Quebecer, I joined the Board to facilitate communications and interactions with other associations and the Quebec government regarding the protection of the lake and its shores.

Wanda Taylor – Membership and US Liaison
I have been visiting the lake my entire life – my uncle and aunt bought the property next to Knight’s landing (South end) in 1936. I bought mine, five lots away , in 1993. My husband and I live near Hershey, Pennsylvania, and we make the trek ‘to the cottage’ as often as possible. I’ve worked in medical research, manufacturing administration, and information technology. I joined the board because the lake is my favorite place on earth.

FISHING SEASON. The Pemichangan (Zone 10) fishing season starts on April 26. Fishing permits can be purchased or renewed online at various retail locations, including the Point-Comfort and the Lac-Sainte-Marie convenience stores. Be sure to show us your catches on the Facebook page!

SPRING COTTAGE TIPS. As the ice retreats and the thermometer rises, many of us will soon be preparing for another spring and summer at the lake. This annual spring ritual involves a number of simple but important ways we can help keep the lake healthy. Here is a brief refresher:

Spring Clean-up. Removing garbage from shorelines helps protect wildlife from potentially harmful waste, but please leave trees, logs and branches in place. Woody debris help control soil erosion and provide feeding, nesting and basking habitat for fish, birds, and turtles. When cleaning, opt for phosphate-free, biodegradable products that are “septic safe,” and use the minimum needed. Avoid antibacterial products and bleach (even indoors) – try cheap, efficient and retro vinegar and water!

Septics. Spring is a great time for residents and cottagers to check that their septic system meets current requirements and is well-maintained. It is also an important time to conserve water, as high spring water tables and saturated ground may reduce a septic system’s effectiveness.

Docks. If you have a dock that needs to be repaired or replaced, opt for non-polluting materials such as natural, untreated wood. Locate docks where they will have the least impact on important aquatic habitat.

Boat Prep. Choose eco-friendly cleaners for boat and trailer washing, and do a thorough clean well away from the lake. A pre-season maintenance inspection can catch safety issues and conditions like cracks and leaks that could contaminate the lake. Once your boat is in the water, forgo chemical boat cleaners for water and a little “elbow grease” (which is good for the lake and may even help to burn a few extra calories!). For more ways to care for the lake year-round, check out the FLP Code of Conduct and Best Practices and keep an eye out for updates on the Facebook page.

PICNIC AND CAMPSITE CORNER. Adopt-a-Site. Do you know about the FLP’s Adopt-a-Site program? Or that the Province or Municipality does not look after our picnic and campsites? Adopting a picnic or campsite is a great way to help preserve the ecology of the lake. If you have kids, it is also a wonderful way for kids to volunteer around the lake. Once a site is adopted, we encourage individuals and families to visit the adopted site 3-4 times over the summer to see if it is in good condition (no damage to trees, abandoned garbage, fires not properly extinguished, or other items needing attention). Please take gloves and a garbage bag with you to carry out any litter you may find. If visitors are using the site, you can engage with them to ask how their visit is going and whether the site was clean when they arrived. It is a great way to let people know that most of the upkeep is done by volunteers. If you are interested in volunteering, please contact Todd Norton.

Heading out on a camping trip soon? Please consider picking up some kindling and firewood at your local convenience store and carrying it in with you. Stores in Point Comfort and Lac-Sainte-Marie supply both. Wood purchased locally has likely been cut from local indigenous sources. Cutting trees and shrubs, picking up small branches and other woody debris from the ground near campsites contributes to soil erosion and the exposure of the roots of existing trees.

Cutting up old trees on your property and not sure what to do with the wood? Consider donating to one of the highly utilized campsites on the lake. Fire-sized cut wood only and no brush, please. If you have wood to donate, please contact Todd Norton.

MEMBERSHIP. At present, approximately 155 cottagers and campers have joined the FLP and yet there are about 300 properties at the lake, joining the FLP is easier than ever and renewals are automatic. Why not join now? For more information, please contact Wanda Taylor.

Have a general concern? Want to help out? Please contact Jeff Stanier through the FLP Website or at 613-3247277. The FLP wants to hear from you!

Sincerely,
Jeff Stanier
FLP President

Fall 2023

Hello everyone!

Well, it seems we went from summer to practically winter in just a day right before Thanksgiving, which unfortunately made for quite a bit of time spent indoors on what is traditionally such a beautiful weekend at the lake. But who’s to complain after the wonderful September we had, as captured in André Isabelle’s photo above. The peace and quiet of autumn at the lake after the busyness of summer provides an opportunity to reflect on our relationship with Pemichangan and how we can help to ensure the lake’s continued health. As such, this edition contains excerpts from Ottawa native Ty Fischer’s reflections on the topic of people’s relationship with lakes after his summer spent assessing lake shorelines. See how much of what Ty writes resonates with you. And, of course, take this time to read about what has been keeping the FLP Board busy over the last months.

Loving the Lake

Ty Fischer and a co-worker spent the summer on Ontario lakes working as a Riparian Habitat Restoration Interns for the Watersheds Canada and Canadian Wildlife Federation shoreline assessment program. In an article he wrote, Ty describes the many types of ways he saw people loving lakes: “the love between shoreline owners and their lakes, the love between members of the community, and the love for our organization and the work [we] were doing.” His insights will surely resonate with most of us and perhaps encourage more owners to join the FLP, OUR organization.

“By the end of our time spent at each lake, writes TY, the connection we felt to these bodies of water extended beyond simply aesthetics and verged into a sort of emotional tether to the whole of the lake, its ecosystems, and its community. I would venture to say that anyone who has spent any time up at a lake might understand what I am referring to. […] I have discovered that the deep connection people forge with lakes is extremely quick to form, is strong in nature, and is often slow (or impossible) to fade away. Like a friendship with the grandest and most complicated friend you have ever had, the longer you spend in and around a lake, the deeper and stronger this tie becomes.

One by-product of this connection which became very clear to me this summer is the sense of community between shoreline owners on lakes. The shared responsibility they have for their lake and their selfless devotion to maintaining its health and to the other members of the lake association was clear to me from the beginning, and this was the source of countless heartwarming moments that repeatedly reinforced my faith in humanity throughout the summer.

As an environmentalist, it was also a metaphor for a larger picture – that enough humans caring about something and collaborating with each other can enact changes that will make our future better. The changes may be gradual, operating on a scale of years and not hours and therefore perhaps difficult to notice in the moment, but the progress that is been made becomes clear when looking back in time. […] As word spreads and our collective knowledge base grows, we begin to set a standard for shoreline owners so that these lakes can be more responsibly enjoyed in the future.” Thank you to Watersheds Canada and Ty Fischer for the use of this excerpt.

2023 AGM

The 2023 AGM was held on July 15 at the Gatineau Fish and Game Club. The Board covered updates on membership, lake health, and camping and went through the details of the proposed bylaw changes that will allow the Board to operate more efficiently. That was followed by a summary of the proposed budget for the next year and the election of the new directors. We had great engagement at the meeting and it was obvious that the members who were present all share a passion for Pemichangan. The most significant feedback heard at the meeting was the frustration with the lack of transparency and information on development around the lake. The Board has spent considerable time since then discussing how to improve this, has created a committee to tackle the issue and will provide an update once a plan is in place. Thank you to everyone who voiced ideas and concerns and who offered help.

Claire Poitras (South end) has joined the Board. In addition to ensuring that there is a continued French presence on the Board, Claire contributes her perspective as a Quebec resident. Marie-Pierre Diotte (South end) and Cameron Jackson (North end) have left the Board. The FLP thanks them both for their contributions!

Association pour la protection du lac des 31-milles

At the invitation of Hugues Raymond, president of the Association pour la protection du lac des 31-milles, Pat Zakaib, Marianne Kennedy-Beaulne and Jeff Stanier drove to Bouchette on August 26 to learn more about the challenges and opportunities facing our neighbouring lake association to the North.

Marlène Thonnard, Interim Head of the Corporation du Parc régional du lac des 31-milles, gave an excellent presentation, taking us through the long-term vision for the park. One important aspect of that vision is to develop and promote solidarity between residents, cottagers, and visitors.

The President’s report was focussed on membership, outreach, milfoil, and the regional park. The Association’s board is communicating to all parties to not use fireworks on the lake and are asking the MRC to adopt a ban throughout the Gatineau Valley. Another interesting fact learned at the meeting was that there are about 340 properties on 31 Mile Lake, roughly the same as the number on Lac Pemichangan. The agenda items were presented with simultaneous translation by Jim Mitchell. It was felt by all of us who attended the meeting that we should consider the same for our next AGM. For more information, see Corporation du Parc régional du lac des 31 milles.

FQDLC

In 2022, the FLP joined the Fédération québécoise de défense des lacs et cours d’eau (FQDLC). Nearly 100 associations for the protection of lakes and municipalities belong to this group. The FQDLC’s mission is to protect the health of Quebec’s lakes and waterways by promoting national action to prevent and control aquatic invasive alien species (AIS), with a particular focus on Eurasian watermilfoil. Among other things, it aims to: act as an intermediary with governmental and regulatory bodies, and intervene to ensure that prevention, control, access to expertise and support programs for communities affected by AIS are implemented from a national perspective, with risk management analysis and recurring support. This will enable the FLP to keep abreast of the latest developments in the fight against AIS and to play an active part in it. For more details, see (in French only) FQDLC.

Short Term Rentals

Gracefield is still working on a comprehensive consolidation of its bylaws, including provisions on short term rentals, now expected for sometime in 2024. For South end owners residing in Lac-Sainte-Marie, information is available at Nouvelles et communauté/Hébergement touristique de courte durée (in French only) on the LSM Website.

Picnic and Campsite Corner

Did you know that proper disposal of human waste is a common problem in many back country camping areas, including the area of Lac Pemichangan? The most accepted form of disposing of human waste while camping is to dig a “cat-hole” – a small hole in the ground dug with a small shovel or by hand and covered up once your business is completed. LUCKILY, all of the designated camping sites on Lac Pemichangan have toilet boxes…YAY!!! Disposing of waste in toilet boxes and cat-holes is the preferred method of human waste disposal because it avoids or reduces the negative impact of visitors encountering feces or toilet paper, animal and insect transmission of pathogens, and water contamination after rainfall. Currently, over one hundred protozoans, bacteria and viruses have been identified in human waste, including the hepatitis A virus. Depending on the type of soil, bacteria may still be present up to one year later. As you might expect, tampons and bleached toilet paper are very resistant to decay. Please pack them out in a bag or container or burn your toilet paper safely at your campfire (Leave No Trace Canada). These simple measures will help ensure that the next campers will also have a wonderful camping experience on clean and beautiful Lac Pemichangan.

Disposal of Old Docks

Disposing of an old dock can be quite a job. Members of the Gatineau Fish and Game Club can contact the club to have a dock picked up for a fee. There are currently no solutions for non-members of the GFGC but the FLP is looking into the matter.

Membership Campaign Results

Many of you were invited personally this summer by Board and other members to join the FLP. The aim of the canvassing campaign was in part to learn why some people decide not to join the FLP and how to address any issues raised. Many property owners claimed they just hadn’t gotten to it. Others thought they had paid their membership or that their spouse had. Hopefully, if that is your case you have joined by now.

Interestingly, one reason mentioned was the fact that the FLP was using membership fees to offer free camping at Pemichangan instead of charging campers. The FLP does not own the land where the campsites are located and, as such, has no legal jurisdiction over it. But the FLP has installed toilets and hires Marcel Chantigny to maintain the sites in line with its mission of protecting the health of the lake and surrounding area so that Pemichangan will continue to be enjoyed by all users.

Some owners have joined as a result of this summer’s canvas. Others have said they would. If you have not yet had the time or were missed during the canvas, you can still join. Thank you to those who joined! For questions on membership, please contact Pat Zakaib.

Have a general concern? Want to help out? Please contact Jeff Stanier. The FLP wants to hear from you!

Sincerely,
Jeff Stanier
President

Directors

Jeff Stanier, President (613) 324-7277
Rick Robertson, Past President (613) 513-7425 richardjrobertson@gmail.com
Samantha Perrin, Finance samantha.perrin@hotmail.com
Michèle Patry, Secretary and Communications mpatry2015@gmail.com
Pat Zakaib, Membership and Outreach pzakaib@gmail.com
Nicole Laframboise, GFGC Boat Launch Committee nlaframboise64@gmail.com
John Hilbrich, GFGC Liaison john.hilbrich@gmail.com
Todd Norton, Camping Culture drtnorton1@gmail.com
Marianne Kennedy Beaulne, North End and Outreach mkennedybeaulne@gmail.com
Claire Poitras, South End and Outreach clairepoitras@videotron.ca
Karen Butterfield, Camping, Watershed and Lake Health kkhbutterfield@hotmail.com
Tracey Henderson, Camping, Watershed and Lake Health thenders@telus.net
Wanda Taylor, USA Liaison pemichongan@comcast.net

Spring 2023

Hello everyone,

How do you know it’s spring? Apart from the Leafs being out of course… You know it’s spring when people start posting photos of wayward docks on the Friends of Lake Pemichangan (FLP) Facebook page. Not to mention shots of happy fishing enthusiasts showing off their catches since the start of fishing on April 28. For many cottage owners, the season at the lake starts in earnest during the upcoming long weekend. As usual, the FLP Board and Committees members have been busy over the winter working on ongoing and new projects aimed at protecting the lake so that everyone can continue enjoying it for years to come. Some of them will even be out there in May and June installing yellow milfoil buoys. Read on to find out what has been keeping them busy and for other news. See you at the lake!

Brent Freeman

Knight Bay’s (South end) has lost one of its icons. Brent Freeman, whose family has been in Knight’s Bay since the 1960’s, passed away this winter. In the 1970’s, Brent’s father William purchased what was then known as Knight’s farm and landing (most of the land in the area). Brent continued his father’s legacy as a gentleman (in every sense of the word) farmer, spending his days tending his land and helping and accommodating neighbours in any way he could. Thank you Brent. You were truly a great friend of Lac Pemichangan.

GFGC Boat Launch. Discussions between the Gatineau Fish and Game Club (GFGC) and the City of Gracefield have intensified in recent weeks and preparations for the new launch are moving forward. The GFGC has started work to prepare the road for the proposed site (across the bay from the current site, near the GFGC gas pump). As noted in the last newsletter, the city intends to pass a bylaw requiring mandatory washing of all boats entering lakes in the municipality, including Pemichangan. The first boat washing station is expected to be in Gracefield – exact location to be determined. The GFGC will continue working with its members and the municipality to move forward with a new boat launch on its property. The existing launch will remain open until such time as the GFGC opens its new launch. FLP Board members John Hilbrich and Nicole Laframboise remain on the GFGC Boat Launch committee. While the new launch will involve an agreement between the municipality and the GFGC, who owns the land and will construct the launch, John and Nicole continue to advocate for the interests of the FLP in this process.

2023 AGM. Save the Date! The 2023 AGM will be held on Saturday July 15, 2023 at 10 am at the Gatineau Fish and Game Club, 10 chemin de Point Comfort, Gracefield. Everyone is welcome but only FLP members can vote at the AGM. The FLP Board and Committees have been working on updating the FLP’s 2015 Articles and ByLaws to simplify processes, and amendments will be submitted to members for approval at the AGM. We would very much appreciate your attendance so that you may learn more of what the FLP does to preserve the lake. All of our Board and Committee members are volunteers. The AGM is an opportunity for you to become involved as well or simply to voice any concerns. We look forward to getting to know you better. Please reach out to any Board or Committee member at any time if you require further information. Hope to see you there!

Americans! Are you covered by health insurance when you’re in Canada? (by Wanda Taylor). Although I live in Pennsylvania, USA, I have vacationed on Lac Pemichangan my entire life. In the last 30 years, I’ve owned a cottage of my own in Knight’s Bay.  “Going to the lake’ is now a natural yearly migration, much like the loons. While I think about and plan (activities, visitors, gear, and food) for our yearly return to the lake, I never once thought about one of us sustaining a serious illness there. I attribute my oversight to the fact that the cottage is my second home – really where my heart lives all the time. However, my traverse to Canada will now have an added task – health insurance. 

Last summer, after only two weeks at the lake, my husband became gravely ill and had to be transported to the Wakefield Hospital by ambulance where he was admitted and treated. We are both senior citizens who rely on US Medicare as our primary insurer. VERY fortunately, we also carry traditional (not Advantage) supplemental health insurance. In so many ways, my husband’s illness was a learning experience.  I’m happy to say that he’s recovering and our ‘lessons learned’ will prepare us – and hopefully others – for future incidents requiring medical treatment and/or hospitalization within Canada.

I’m not an expert on health or travel insurance. My goal is to make you aware that there may be pitfalls and make some suggestions for preventing them. My lessons learned:

  • No matter who, what age, or what length of time travelling within Canada’s borders, check your foreign coverage. And I suggest you call your agent or coverer, because there may be exceptions that are not stated in coverage summaries.
  • Senior citizens – do not assume Medicare covers you, because it does NOT (except for a rare exception).
  • Check both primary and secondary insurance coverage. For instance, in our case, Medicare covered nothing, but thankfully, our supplemental insurance covered what Medicare would cover within the United States. If employed, you may be covered by two plans – make sure there are no exceptions for foreign coverage, so check all your plans.
  • You’ll have to pay UP FRONT for services, and then request reimbursement from your insurer after the fact. So be prepared for that, regardless of your coverage.
  • Traditional trip insurance, like you’d take out if taking a cruise, covers the costs of your trip, and it does include medical and transportation coverage. It is date-based and has a lot of coverage that does not pertain when we are staying at the cottage for the summer, such as Trip Cancellation, Trip Interruption, and more. Also, most plans are invalidated if you cross back and forth to the US over the course of the summer. Yearly trip insurance is available, but there may be a limit to the length of a single trip.

Bottom line – seriously consider the consequences of not carrying health insurance that covers Canada! For more information on this or other issues of interest for US members, please contact Wanda Taylor.

Chemin du Lac Pemichangan Roadwork. The planned paving of chemin du Lac Pemichangan (South end) will not start for a few years. Gracefield and Lac-Sainte-Marie have agreed to share the costs, but the MRC has also applied for financing from the provincial government. No work will be done until such financing has been received. Until then, the road will continue to be maintained as it has in the past.

Yellow Buoys. Eurasian water milfoil continues to spread in the lake, including in some of its most cherished and busiest areas. Because milfoil spreads by fragmentation, one of the best ways to help prevent further spread is to avoid the use of any motorized watercraft within the weed-beds. To help with this, the FLP will once again be installing yellow marker buoys which act as a visual reminder to steer clear of these areas. In most cases, if you see a line of yellow buoys, you should stay on the side of the buoys furthest from shore. Occasionally, the buoys will go straight across a narrow area – this means there is no way to proceed through that area without avoiding the bed so please glide through these areas with motors off and/or lifted depending on the height of the weed. If you can help place buoys in May or June, please contact Tracey Henderson, Marianne Kennedy Beaulne or any other Board Member.

Light Pollution at the Lake. The special beauty of nighttime at the lake – an expanse of stars, haunting loon calls, the spark of fireflies, the rustle of animals –  is all at risk when too much light is added into the mix. We often think about light pollution in terms of star-gazing, and it is true that thousands more stars are visible on a moonless night at the lake than can be seen in any city…provided there is no glare from nearby lights! But nighttime lighting impacts more than our view of the sky. Birds and nocturnal animals that use stars to navigate can become dangerously disoriented by artificial light. Research has found that artificial light also influences wildlife’s stress and hormone levels, predator-prey relationships and foraging, feeding and mating behaviours. Even small water organisms, fish and wildflowers can be impacted by changing light patterns. The good news is that light pollution is easy to remedy. The FLP Code of Ethics provides a simple guide to lighting best practices: use a minimum of outdoor lighting in warm tones only when needed, shaded and directed downward. If safety is a concern, consider motion sensor lights and timers, and remember that reflective tape and markers provide non-intrusive alternatives to dock and pathway lighting. Fortunately, following these guidelines is not only good for nature and enjoying starry skies – it saves energy and money too! For more ideas, see:

Where to place outdoor cottage lighting
https://astro-canada.ca/la_pollution_lumineuse-light_pollution-eng
https://cottagelife.com/outdoors/3-key-ways-that-light-pollution-negatively-impacts-nature/
https://www.darksky.org

Picnic and Campsite Corner. Did you know that the FLP has an Adopt-a-Site program? That the Province or Municipality does not look after our picnic and campsites? Adopting a picnic or campsite is a great way to help preserve the ecology of the lake. If you have kids, it is also a wonderful way for the kids to volunteer and feel like they are part of helping to look after the lake. Once a site is adopted, we encourage individuals and families to visit the adopted site 3-4 times over the summer to see if it is in good condition (no damage to trees, abandoned garbage, fires not properly extinguished, or other items needing attention). Please take gloves and a garbage bag with you to carry out any litter you may find. If visitors are using the site, you can engage with them and ask how their visit is going and if the site was clean when they arrived. It is a great way to let people know that most of the upkeep is done by volunteers. If you are interested, please contact Todd Norton.

Did you know that garbage burned in a campfire may leave traces of heavy metals in campfire ash? Burned plastics and packaging from freeze dried foods; plastic cups, forks and spoons; and snack sized chip bags were found to leave elevated levels of lead in the ash of campfires. If the ash is scattered it can contaminate the soil, water, and wildlife…not to mention humans. Hazardous air pollutants that were measured in one study from the smoke in campfires that  contained garbage (also think plastics here) included aromatic hydrocarbons like benzene, naphthalene, styrene, toluene and xylene. These are all considered carcinogenic and can be severe eye, nose, and throat irritants. (Leave No Trace Canada) Please carry out all that you carry in and dispose of it responsibly!

Membership Campaign. The total number of cottages or residences on the lake is 305.  At present, approximately 155 cottagers and campers have joined the FLP, your lake association. We are relaunching our campaign to increase membership. Each member of the elected FLP Board has been assigned approximately 20 property owners to visit to provide them with the FLP Code of Ethics, an invitation to the AGM and a one-page overview on what the FLP does for you. Joining the FLP is easier than ever and renewals are automatic. For more information, please contact Pat Zakaib.

Have a general concern? Want to help out? Please contact Jeff Stanier or Rick Robertson. The FLP wants to hear from you!

Sincerely,
Jeff Stanier
FLP President

 

Directors

Jeff Stanier, President, Secretary and IT (613) 324-7277

Rick Robertson, Past President and Public Relations (613) 513-7425 richardjrobertson@gmail.com

Michèle Patry, Communications mpatry2015@gmail.com

Todd Norton, Camping Culture drtnorton1@gmail.com

Pat Zakaib, Membership pzakaib@gmail.com

Cameron Jackson, Water Testing and Social Media Calendar cameronpauljackson@gmail.com

Nicole Laframboise, GFGC Boat Launch Committee nlaframboise64@gmail.com

Wanda Taylor, USA Liaison pemichongan@comcast.net

Marianne Kennedy Beaulne, North End mkennedybeaulne@gmail.com

Karen Butterfield, Camping, Watershed and Lake Health kkhbutterfield@hotmail.com

Board Committee Members

Tracey Henderson, Camping, Watershed and Lake Health thenders@telus.net

John Hilbrich, GFGC Liaison john.hilbrich@gmail.com

Kristina Inrig, Alie Bay kristina.inrig@gmail.com

Samantha Perrin, Finance samantha.perrin@hotmail.com

Fall 2022

Hello everyone!

Winter is indeed coming…but who’s to complain after the wonderful fall we’ve had? It seems from the Friends of Lac Pemichangan Facebook page that many photo enthusiasts are having the time of their lives at the lake this fall. Thanks to everyone who posted photos and in particular to Kelly Hunter for agreeing to let us use one of her photos on our cover page. At last count the FLP had 757 followers on Facebook! A reminder that no commercial material is allowed so if you have something to sell or rent, please use the Pemichangan Marketplace Facebook page created by Frank Hutchingame. As things quiet down, take this time to read about what has been keeping the FLP Board and Committees busy over the last months.

Changes on the Board

Rick Roberston resigned as FLP President this year after eight full years of hard work leading the FLP and doing what he does so well – using his very extensive network to keep the FLP informed on what other lake associations are doing to protect the environment and on what property owners from all over the lake and other members think are critical issues for Pemichangan. Long time Board member Jeff Stanier is the new President. Rick met with various government representatives over the years and, as such, will now help the FLP in his new role as Director in charge of Public Relations, assisted by Michèle Patry. Rick also tirelessly spearheaded the automatic membership fee renewal initiative until the feature became operational last year. He was relentless in its pursuit. From Rick: “To all property owners on Lac Pemichangan and other FLP members, Just a quick note, as your president, to sincerely thank everyone for their support and expertise in achieving so much to protect beautiful Pemichangan over the past eight years. I have enjoyed every minute of it. I will stay on the board as past president. Now please go on line and join the FLP, our goal is 300 members and we are now closing in on 200! And welcome Jeff Stanier as your new president! Best regards, Rick”.

Patrick Beaudry, Director in charge of Public Relations, resigned from the Board over the summer to pursue many other endeavours. Patrick’s boundless energy, outstanding interpersonal skills, proficiency in both English and French and talent in handling sensitive issues with will be sorely missed. Along with Rick, he established solid working relationships with many government and association representatives during his time as FLP Board member on which the FLP will continue to build in the future.Thank you Patrick and good luck with your new projects!

2022 AGM

The 2022 AGM was held at the Gatineau Fish and Game Club (GFGC) on July 16. It felt good to get together in person after a few years of virtual meetings. The AGM offers a rare opportunity for people from the lake and other FLP members to meet and share perspectives and news on what is happening at the lake. The Board reported on its work done over the last year. Three “Great Friends of Lac Pemichangan” plaques were presented: to the Annis Family, for their work on the Board in several capacities over the years, to Bev and Gaston Caron, the recently retired longtime owners of the depanneur in Point Comfort, and to Kim and Dale Snider, the FLP’s devoted water testers and buoy persons for many years. Participants voiced their opinions on many issues, including the difficulty of voting in the recent municipal elections due to the fact that there was no voting by mail.

Board Priorities

The new Board has set the following priorities for the coming year: lake development and shoreline protection, GFGC boat launch, lake health, reorganization of the board into operational and committee sections and continued membership drive.

GFGC Boat Launch

In mid-2020, the GFGC set up a committee to help find a new boat launch into Lac Pemichangan to replace the existing launch on GFGC land (next to the Clubhouse on Chemin Point Comfort) which was assessed as unsafe.The new Chair of the Launch Committee is Laurel Murray, who took over from Tim Casgrain in August. Much work has been undertaken over the past 18 months as regards search, analysis, and consultations with local governments and other stakeholders. The committee gets regular guidance from the GFGC Board on broad parameters as the work moves forward. The status of progress is as follows:

  1. The new launch will be on GFGC land in a different part of the same bay. The GFGC will undertake the construction of the related infrastructure for the site.
  2. The launch will be accessed by an automated gate, which will be activated by electronic evidence of recent boat washing at Gracefield boat-washing sites (e.g., QR code). Different electronic modalities have been explored and the exact choice is to be determined. Gracefield is expected to have at least two boat-washing sites operating in the vicinity by spring 2023.
  3. The launch is for the use of GFGC members and will be accessible to the broader community provided those wishing to use the launch have followed the boat-washing requirements (described in #2).
  4. Environmental issues are an important element of the new launch. All aspects of environmental impact and permitting have been and continue to be examined and reviewed, and government permits sought.
  5. Communications will be an important part of the process. A communications plan will be developed in consultation with the GFGC, the FLP, the local governments and other local stakeholders to make clear: (i) that the new launch has benefited from consultations with stakeholders and from review of comparable launch sites in the region/province; (ii) the reasons for the new launch/closure of the old launch, and (iii) the key requirements for accessing the new launch.
  6. The existing launch will be closed when the new launch is operational. This is currently expected to take place in late summer/fall of 2023.

Short term rentals

Gracefield municipal bylaws do not currently allow short term rentals such as Airbnb on the municipality’s territory but changes to the bylaws are apparently in the works. The FLP is following the matter closely and will keep its members informed on new developments.

Water Testing

Water transparency testing continued this year, with measurements taken at two locations in the lake. Results continued to be within the 10-year average, although depth reading averages were slightly smaller (due to the large amounts of pollen in the water early in the season). These transparency measurement results support the notion of clear lake waters remaining healthy.

Buoys

Thank you to the FLP members who helped install and remove yellow buoys marking critical milfoil areas identified by the 2019 SAGE report and red buoys marking danger zones, in particular Marianne Kennedy Beaulne, Tracey Henderson, Marie-Pierre Diotte, Nicole Laframboise, Kim Snider, Cameron Jackson, Claudine Tremblay, Jean-Luc Cadieux and Jean Lamothe. Marking milfoil is an increasingly important initiative, and we hope to get an early start in 2023. If you would like buoys for an area of milfoil near you or want to help install buoys, please reach out to Cameron Jackson or Marianne Kennedy Beaulne.

Code of Conduct and Best Practices

The FLP’s new Code of Conduct and Best Practices was distributed to members at the AGM, and to some property owners as part of a canvassing campaign over the summer. A special thanks to FLP members Pam Curie and Ginette Viau for helping canvassing efforts at the North end.The three main areas covered are best practices on the water and on land, and how we share these spaces while protecting the health of the lake and its environs and respecting all users. The FLP looked to a number of sources to prepare its code, including other lake and recreational associations and research studies. Copies are available from Marianne Kennedy Beaulne or Marie-Pierre Diotte.

Adopt a Site

Thank you to the families who participated in the Adopt-a-Site program. The Leave No Trace Camping message seems for the most part to be getting through based on impromptu visits to various sites and on spot checks with campers on the condition of the sites upon their arrival. Sadly, there still seems to be a problem with noise and loud music from some campsite users. Sites were less busy this year in general. If you are interested in taking part in the program next summer, please contact Todd Norton.

Membership

The FLP currently has about 156 members (out of a possible 330). If you used the new automatic membership feature on the FLP website, your renewal will now be easy and automatic. It’s never too late to join. Property owners who have provided their email to the FLP continue to receive FLP mailings whether or not they are members, but by paying a membership you help fund FLP projects and you let Board and Committee members know that you support their mission of protecting the lake. Thank you to all our members! If you have any questions about membership, please contact Pat Zakaib.

Have a concern? Want to help out? Contact Rick Robertson at (613) 513-7425. The FLP wants to hear from you!

Sincerely,
Jeff Stanier
FLP President

Directors

Jeff Stanier, President, Secretary and IT (613) 324-7277
Rick Robertson, Past President and Public Relations (613) 513-7425 richardjrobertson@gmail.com
Michèle Patry, Communications and Public Relations mpatry2015@gmail.com
Todd Norton, Camping Culture drtnorton1@gmail.com
Pat Zakaib, Membership pzakaib@gmail.com
Cameron Jackson, Water Testing and Social Media Calendar cameronpauljackson@gmail.com
Nicole Laframboise, GFGC Boat Launch Committee nlaframboise64@gmail.com
Wanda Taylor, USA Liaison pemichongan@comcast.net
Marie-Pierre Diotte, South End les2marie@msn.com
Marianne Kennedy Beaulne, North End mkennedybeaulne@gmail.com
Karen Butterfield, Camping, Watershed and Lake Health kkhbutterfield@hotmail.com

Board Committee Members

Tracey Henderson, Camping, Watershed and Lake Health thenders@telus.net
John Hilbrich, GFGC Liaison john.hilbrich@gmail.com
Kristina Inrig, Alie Bay kristina.inrig@gmail.com
Samantha Perrin, Finance samantha.perrin@hotmail.com
David Lees, Membership Outreach (613) 866-5337 davidlees@bell.ca

Winter 2022

Hello everyone,

I hope you have all managed to find a way to make the most of living in a pandemic and I am sure your Pemichangan connection has been an integral part of the plan.

Pandemic or not, the FLP Board has been hard at work and, as usual, it has a full workload this year to fulfill its mission of protecting the lake. What is unusual though is the number of new faces on our highly skilled team. Seventeen people expressed an interest in joining the FLP’s Board at the AGM! The FLP now has 12 directors, in addition to five committee members who have taken on responsibilities in their areas of interest. Here is a quick overview of what has happened since last fall and what’s in store for this year:

2021 AGM.
Because of health restrictions limiting social gatherings, the AGM was held on Zoom. Many thanks to the approximately 30 members (from as far as Pennsylvania and Alberta) who took the time to attend on November 16. The Board reported on its accomplishments of the last year and answered many questions. Once again, the virtual format allowed members who are not necessarily at the lake in July to attend.

As mentioned, a renewed team of 17 people now represent your interests (up from 7 last year). Good to know about the 2022 team: it is comprised of 7 men and 10 women from various areas of the lake (south – 5, north – 8, Chantigny Island – 4), 4 people are Francophones, most are bilingual, and 3 are American.

Many new areas of interest and projects have already been identified to further the FLP’s mission of protecting the lake thanks to our new members. Here are the Board and Committee priorities for this year in no particular order:

2022 Priorities

  1. GFGC Boat Launch (North End)
  2. Milfoil Control
  3. Watershed Protection
  4. Camping Culture
  5. Lake Health Initiative
  6. Code of Ethics
  7. Communications and Social Media
  8. Membership Outreach

GFGC Boat Launch Update.
The boat launch committee at the Gatineau Fish and Game Club has been working to advance a plan for the new boat launch location identified on Club land in the same bay, but south of the Pemichangan/GFGC gas pump. The process however is complex, with many layers of work underway, including preparing feasibility studies for land surveying, engineering (road, parking lot, ramp), environmental impact and remediation, and cost estimates. The committee has also begun discussions with the municipality, led by newly elected mayor Mathieu Caron, to negotiate a legal arrangement between the Club and the local government that will ensure effective operation of the launch in a way that ensures the best interests of the lake, property owners and Club members.

As the Municipality and the Club continue to hammer out the operational details, the FLP has made its position abundantly clear: the new ramp is the best opportunity we have to preserve the lake. As it stands, the unfettered “free for all” launch is not only unsafe for its users, it is also a contributing factor to the deterioration of the environment. The current ramp lets dirty boats bring invasive species into our lake, while the ever increasing numbers and size of boats contribute to the propagation of milfoil and the deterioration of the shoreline. Let us reassure our members that the FLP has made its position abundantly clear to both the Municipality and the Club: the ramp must be managed while having boat washing as a mandatory condition. Without these two fundamental principles in place, we will see the lake we love deteriorate before our eyes.

Lake Health Initiative.
For many years the FLP has managed programs to help ensure Pemichangan remains as healthy and unspoiled as possible. We have a water quality monitoring program, strategies and outreach to help minimize the spread of Eurasian milfoil and other invasive species, and we’ve cleaned up campsites and taken steps to encourage responsible use of those campsites. However, as human activity and development pressures on our lake continue to increase, there is a risk that much of what we love about Pemichangan could become compromised by the cumulative impacts of that activity. To that end, a few FLP members have stepped forward to help the board explore additional opportunities that exist, or could be created, to more thoroughly and proactively monitor the health of the lake over time. We have big aspirations of ultimately having a more rigorous evaluation of the health of the lake and its ecosystem. Ideally this would include an understanding of the cumulative effects on the lake from a variety of factors including increasing human activity, loss of natural shoreline, and our changing climate. But, given our finite resources, capacity, and expertise, we are starting small. That means in this first year we will focus on looking into what exists that we can leverage:

  • Collecting information, reports, and studies that have focused on issues related to lake and/or aspects of ecosystem health on Pemichangan or neighbouring lakes,
  • Looking into what other pro-active initiatives are happening on other lakes within and beyond our watershed,
  • Contacting organizations, local and/or provincial government agencies and academic institutions that could possibly help us out, be that through recommendations, information, funding, partnerships, etc.

If you have any ideas, recommendations, contacts, or a willingness to get involved in this initiative, please contact Tracey Henderson (email below).

US Owners.
The 17 months of border closure due to the pandemic highlighted the unique aspects of non-Canadian citizen cottage owners. US citizens have been enjoying Pemichangan since the 1930s, and the regulations for owning property – and even crossing into Canada – have changed dramatically over the years. We now have a US Liaison, Wanda Taylor, who will be looking into social, legal, and citizen-related topics of interest for those Friends of Lac Pemichangan who are US citizens. The first step is to find out all cottagers who are US citizens. Please send Wanda a message (email below) with your name, lake address and US contact information so that we can communicate about the special needs of US cottage owners.

Adopt-a-Site Program.
The FLP is happy that owners and visitors can enjoy the lake’s 15 camping and 7 picnic sites. It has now completed the survey of all of the sites undertaken a few years ago and has posted an updated map on its website. The FLP hires Marcel Chantigny every year to maintain the sites but is creating an Adopt-a-Site program where families can be involved in the maintenance of a site of their choosing by checking the site periodically over the summer. Details to come in the next newsletter. If you are interested, please contact Todd Norton (email below).

Code of Ethics.
In keeping with its mission of protecting the lake, the FLP is now working on a Code of Ethics for cottagers and other lake users (such as renters and campers), similar to that of many other lake associations, to set down basic principles and guidelines on three main topics : the environment, noise and other pollution, and safety. If you have any ideas on the topic or wish to obtain literature for renters, please contact Marie-Pierre Diotte or Marianne Kennedy Beaulne (emails below).

Membership and Automatic Renewal.
No newsletter is complete without a word on membership and renewals. The FLP now has approximately 171 members (out of a possible 330), down slightly from last year but well above numbers for previous years. If you used the new automatic membership feature last year, your renewal (which remains at $40) will occur automatically. As announced at the AGM, membership fees have now increased to $50 BUT since our automatic renewal feature has not yet been updated on the website you may still be able to benefit from the $40 membership if you act soon. Sign up for automatic renewal HERE. You do not have to be a member to receive FLP mailings, but your membership helps fund FLP initiatives and lets the Board and Committee members know that you support their efforts. Thank you to all our members! If you have questions regarding your membership, please contact Pat Zakaib (email below).

Sincerely,
Rick Robertson
FLP President

Directors

Rick Robertson, President (613) 513-7425 richardjrobertson@gmail.com
Jeff Stanier, Secretary and IT (613) 324-7277
Patrick Beaudry, Public and Government Relations (819) 635-6680
Michèle Patry, Communications mpatry2015@gmail.com
Todd Norton, Camping Culture drtnorton1@gmail.com
Pat Zakaib, Membership pzakaib@gmail.com
Cameron Jackson, Water Testing and Social Media Calendar cameronpauljackson@gmail.com
Nicole Laframboise, GFGC Boat Launch Committee nlaframboise64@gmail.com
Wanda Taylor, USA Liaison pemichongan@comcast.net
Marie-Pierre Diotte, Code of Ethics and South End les2marie@msn.com
Marianne Kennedy Beaulne, Code of Ethics and North End mkennedybeaulne@gmail.com
Karen Butterfield, Camping, Watershed and Lake Health kkhbutterfield@hotmail.com

Board Committee Members

Tracey Henderson, Camping, Watershed and Lake Health thenders@telus.net
John Hilbrich, GFGC Liaison john.hilbrich@gmail.com
Kristina Inrig, Alie Bay kristina.inrig@gmail.com
Samantha Perrin, Finance sperr@ctf-fce.ca
David Lees, Membership Outreach (613) 866-5337 davidlees@bell.net

Spring 2022

Hello everyone!

Finally, no masks! Instead of Covid, this year we’ve been worrying about the drought of the last weeks, quite an improvement. Although nature (including Pemichangan’s bees) has suffered somewhat from the drought, it will still be there to welcome us this long weekend when many of us start getting things ready for summer. It seems from the FLP Facebook page that one of the things keeping many people busy over the weekend will be dock hunting! There have been many photos of escaped docks posted over the last month. If your dock is gone, check the Facebook page. In the meantime, read on for the latest on what the FLP Board and Committees have been up to.

North End Boat Launch.
Further to the update provided in our previous newsletter, work continues by the Gatineau Fish and Game Club and the Municipality of Gracefield to prepare the site for a new launch. In order to ensure the preservation of our lake, the FLP has made it abundantly clear that mandatory boat washing, as well as proper management of incoming/outgoing boat traffic, must be top of mind. As new information becomes available, we will advise our members accordingly.

Red and Yellow Buoys.
Now that Kim Snider has retired form her position on the Board, Marianne Kennedy Beaulne (with the help of Cameron Jackson) will be responsible for installing the red buoys marking danger zones and the yellow buoys marking the critical milfoil areas in the lake identified by the SAGE report. The FLP has a few extra yellow buoys for anyone with milfoil in front of their cottage. You can also purchase your own buoys at The Chandlery Marine Supplies. The FLP needs help installing the buoys so please contact Marianne (email below) if you can spare a few hours in May.

Code of Conduct Coming Soon.
Stay tuned for the FLP’s new Code of Conduct for cottagers and other visitors such as renters and campers. The three main areas covered are the environment, disturbances (think noise and artificial light, for example) and safety. The FLP has looked to other lake associations to prepare its own code. For more information, please contact Marianne Kennedy Beaulne or Marie-Pierre Diotte (emails below).

Adopt a Site.
If you or your family want a reason to visit Pemichangan’s picnic or camp sites, Adopt a Site is for you! You can help the FLP keep sites clean by selecting a site to visit a few times over the summer to see if it is in good shape (no damage to trees, fires out and no garbage or items needing attention). If visitors are using the site, you can ask them how their visit is going. It’s a great way to help let people know that most of the upkeep is done by volunteers. It is also a wonderful opportunity for kids and teens to get involved in looking after the lake. If you are interested, please contact Todd Norton (email below).

Campers should note that there is NO site reservation system at Pemichangan. The main purpose of maintaining the picnic and camp sites on the lake is to prevent campers from moving to other locations on Pemichangan. The FLP (through its volunteers) will continue this summer to install toilets at the few sites that do not yet have them. Marcel Chantigny has once again been hired to keep the sites clean. However, it is difficult for one person to cover the entire lake all of the time, hence the reason we are asking for support from volunteers. Marcel will stop by once or twice a week to clean up, check that the campfires are out and remove any garbage left behind. If campers are present, he will ask if they want to dispose of any garbage. Leave No Trace Camping is the best way for campers to help Pemichangan.

Interesting Facts about Loons.
Loons love Pemichangan for the same reasons we do: pristine waters and plenty of fish! They prey by sight and therefore prefer clear lakes because they can more easily see their prey through the water.

Loons are the sign of a healthy lake and the good news is that, in 2019, a 20-year follow-up study on mercury concentrations in loons showed that Pemichangan loons are among the healthiest in Canada, with mercury levels remaining at low risk of reduced reproductive success. Most amazingly, the same adult male, first captured and sampled in 1997, was recaptured 22 years later in the same bay (Ritchie Bay). Estimated to be at least 28 years old, he is one of the oldest loons in North America! Even so, like loon populations everywhere, our cherished loons are still vulnerable to pollution and disturbance.

Most loons nest from mid to the end of May, very close to water and preferably on island locations away from potential predators such as the bald eagle. They typically lay two eggs, which both parents take turns incubating for approximately 29 days; the parents provide high levels of care to their chicks for their first eight weeks or so, and the fledglings typically learn to fly a few weeks later.

Loons cannot walk efficiently on land (hence the clumsy gait from which they get their name) but are excellent swimmers and powerful fliers. Although it needs to run a sufficient distance across the surface of the water to generate enough force to take-off, once it gets going the loon can fly up to 120 km/h. In winter, loons migrate to shallow coastal marine habitats (another trait they share with the friends of lake Pemichangan!).

Although our loons are still healthy and thriving, part of the FLP’s mission is to keep them this way by preserving their habitat. Such things as avoiding waves near their nests and avoiding chemical, noise and light pollution will help. More advice on preservation will be included in the upcoming code of conduct.

Fishing Season.
Pemichangan’s (Zone 10) fishing season started on April 22 but game and fish wardens have been around in the area since the beginning of April so make sure you follow applicable rules and regulations. Fishing permits are available at various retail locations, including the depanneur in Point Comfort and Marché Ami, in Lac-Sainte-Marie. Let’s see your fish on the FLP Facebook page!

Changes to the FLP Facebook Page.
Posts of a commercial nature such as requests for cottages for rent or sale are no longer permitted on the FLP’s Facebook page, the FLP’s mission being the preservation of the health and environment of the lake. To post ads or inquiries of a commercial nature, please use the Pemichangan Marketplace Facebook page.

Membership.
The FLP currently has about 159 members (out of a possible 330). If you used the new automatic membership feature, your renewal will be automatic. You can take advantage of this feature if you join through the FLP website. If you have any questions about membership, please contact Pat Zakaib (email below). And if you are a U.S. member/owner, please let Wanda Taylor (email below) know. Wanda is acting as liaison to the U.S. friends of Lake Pemichangan and will bring unique information to your attention – if she has your contact information!

You receive FLP mailings even if you are not a member, but your membership helps fund the association’s projects and lets board and committee members know that you support their efforts. Thank you to all our members!

Have a concern? Want to help out on a particular project? Contact Rick Robertson at (613) 513-7425. The FLP wants to hear from you. In the meantime, enjoy the long weekend and don’t work too hard!

Sincerely,

Rick Robertson
FLP President

Directors

Rick Robertson, President (613) 513-7425 richardjrobertson@gmail.com
Jeff Stanier, Secretary and IT (613) 324-7277
Patrick Beaudry, Public and Government Relations (819) 635-6680
Michèle Patry, Communications mpatry2015@gmail.com
Todd Norton, Camping Culture drtnorton1@gmail.com
Pat Zakaib, Membership pzakaib@gmail.com
Cameron Jackson, Water Testing and Social Media Calendar cameronpauljackson@gmail.com
Nicole Laframboise, GFGC Boat Launch Committee nlaframboise64@gmail.com
Wanda Taylor, USA Liaison pemichongan@comcast.net
Marie-Pierre Diotte, Code of Ethics and South End les2marie@msn.com
Marianne Kennedy Beaulne, Code of Ethics and North End mkennedybeaulne@gmail.com
Karen Butterfield, Camping, Watershed and Lake Health kkhbutterfield@hotmail.com

Board Committee Members
Tracey Henderson, Camping, Watershed and Lake Health thenders@telus.net
John Hilbrich, GFGC Liaison john.hilbrich@gmail.com
Kristina Inrig, Alie Bay kristina.inrig@gmail.com
Samantha Perrin, Finance sperr@ctf-fce.ca
David Lees, Membership Outreach (613) 866-5337 davidlees@bell.net